Sunday, June 21, 2015

Share Something Your Dad Liked to have a Chance to Win a Book


Everybody needs a dad. That somehow is not the same as a father. A father is something we all have. But somehow when you say Dad it changes that father into someone you can run to when you skin your knee or when you need your bike handlebars tightened or to give you a boost up into a tree. Or to take you on a ski lift when you're five. I don't really remember the ride, but I love the picture.

My dad was a farmer. He worked hard, growing crops and tending cattle. We had hogs, cows, sheep and chickens. Dad sold cream before I can remember and then later milk in metal milk cans. Mom traded eggs for groceries at the local country store. We made our own sausage and salted down our hams and cooked our lard. We had a freezer full of beef and a cellar full of potatoes and canned vegetables and fruits. 

I remember Dad on a tractor, feeding the cows or taking care of whatever needed doing at the time. He built a barn by himself. He repaired the roof when it leaked and sawed our wood for the stove. He liked to play cards and was serious about winning. He pitched horseshoes and was hard to beat. He played clay court croquet in a league. He went on a motorcycle to Oregon when he was twenty-one. He didn't marry until he was almost thirty. He was a good dad and I miss him.   

The Flower Mystery


None of you guessed that the flower last week was a wild rose. And I thought you'd all figure it out. But I'm glad a few of you threw your name in the hat for a book. The odds were really good for you, but of course, I still only drew out one number. Linda Mc, you were my lucky winner this post. I'll be in touch to find out what book you'd like to have.

New Game - Tell Me Something Your Dad Liked

Not really a game this time. But if you leave a comment and tell me something your dad liked then I'll throw your name in the hat for this post's contest. Deadline is Wednesday at 7 p.m. EST. And then I'll have one last blog book giveaway game posted Wednesday night. We'll have a new flower game of some kind maybe. Remember, you have to be 18 years old to play.

Contest to Celebrate The Innocent

I also sent out a newsletter with a contest to celebrate the release of my new Shaker book, The Innocent. If you'd like to throw your name in that hat, check out the Shaker prizes and how to enter at www.annhgabhart.com/events.html. But meanwhile back here at the farm, er blog, you can make a comment to have a chance to win your choice of one of my books. 

And as always, thanks for reading!



21 comments:

  1. My father, Pop, as we call him, is a simple man. Salt of the earth. Early to bed, early to rise. Work hard. Play harder. Organization and order produce good things.
    But he is also a complicated, or rather, creative, man.
    He enjoyed painting, for example and painted lovely mountain or rural scenes. He loved delving into American history and was full of tidbits of information that none of us had heard before. He created and carved intricate boats and ships from wood that he salvaged, he had the ultimate green thumb, everything grew, without pesticides (our garden was the envy of the neighborhood), and he had a huge heart for abandoned or neglected animals. He simply could not walk by one in need of help.
    The funny thing is, that his true love and I would say, calling, was cooking. Not just the average "man stuff," like, bacon or other meats (although his Prime Rib made people's mouths water!), but intricate sauces and dips. Shrimp Scampi. Hungarian Cabbage Noodles. Tasty gravies. Hearty soups. Thick grainy breads. Everything he created was a delightful surprise! It was like art.
    Only the family (and some very lucky neighbors), knew about his penchant for cooking. He would have been embarrassed by any attention that was not focused on sports or work.You know, the "manly" type things.
    He is older now, so does not cook anymore, but none of us will forget the way he roasted little red potatoes with onion and other fresh garden vegetables in his special seasonings or added just the right reduction to his meal and then presented these things with a swoop and a garnish.
    It seems that in many ways, Pop, an electrician and liquor store owner by trade, was a Renaissance man in our little world.
    M LaPointe 6/22/2015

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    1. Your dad sounds like quite a man, Michele. And it must be good to put your feet under his table and let him cook for you. Thanks for sharing about him.

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  2. My Dad passed away of a massive stroke when I was five months pregnant with his first grandchild. He was only 46.
    He played anything he heard a tune of by ear on his Gibson guitar. He also lived to go camping. I did not inherit his musical ability but I did inherit the camping gene.
    Unfortunately he also loved his beer and liquor a little too much......
    tumcsec(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Sounds like your dad was a nice guy that you lost way too soon, Gail. Thank you for sharing about him. I'm sure you think about him often when you're camping.

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  3. My dad loves to cook! He didn't cook anything fancy, but I still crave some of his recipes and ask him to make them when I visit.

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    1. Those plain everyday dishes are sometimes the best, Susan. I'm sure it makes him happy when he can cook those favorites for you.

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  4. My dad is a retired farmer. He still puts in a large garden (he's 86). He loves fresh tomatoes, watermelon, and homemade icecream. He also loves the Lord. I'm very thankful he and my mom are still living and doing fairly well. I was able to be with them to celebrate Father's Day and some family birthdays.
    pmkellogg56[at]gmail[dot]com

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    1. It is a blessing to have our parents for so long, Pam. My dad didn't make it that old but I have good memories of him. We often made homemade ice cream when the family got together. So good that your dad is going strong and that you are able to visit on important family times.

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  5. My dad is a retired missionary to Africa. He loved to play tennis and played every day after work as a stress reliever. They fixed up the tennis court and net and had such fun. On week-end nights they showed Laurel & Hardy movies to all who showed up. Great memories. sm wileygreen1(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Thanks for sharing about your dad, Sharon. Sounds as if he knew how to have fun and to share laughter with his friends. Great memories are a gift.

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  6. My father seemed to be born with the talent to do most anything - he is now 93 years old and has been in stage 4 prostate cancer for over 2 years, unable to do most of the things he used to do (which frustrates him).

    He grew up on a farm, working in the fields as soon as he was able to hold a hoe. He was expected to help with anything that needed doing - at a young age - continuing that work ethic and at his parents "beck and call" until their deaths.

    He purchased his own farm (from his parents) at a young age, he and my mother still live there - it is the farm I was raised on, and one that has been in the family for several generations. In addition to the many tasks involved with operating a farm (raising crops, animals, and gardens) - he built approximately 15 houses (some of which are rental properties), was owner/operator of a Western Auto store for a number of years, and could build or repair most anything (mechanical or otherwise).

    As stated previously - he doesn't have the strength or endurance to do many of the things he used to do, has mobility issues and his hands are somewhat shaky, he is also near deaf (but refuses to get a hearing aid). However, he loves talking to people- attends funerals of those people he knew, visits the nursing homes, always has conversations with people after church services, visits with friends at the local restaurants, and his one vice is attending a weekly country music show - 12 miles from home - my brother usually takes him, I take him when my brother has to be out of town. Although he has finally allowed my brother or I to drive him - most places - he continues to drive locally for short distances. He still "putters" in his shop (a building where my brother raised hogs previously), watches Walton reruns over and over, and has a huge "sweet tooth".

    He and my mother were featured in the Louisville, Ky. Sunday newspaper a couple of weeks ago - a 3 page article, with pictures, about their lives, the history of the property he owns (dating back to pre-civil war), and it's involvement in a new multi-county park development now under way.

    I don't think you anticipated a history lesson, Ann - however, this is what came out when I started to type, lol!!

    bonnieroof60(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. I enjoyed hearing about your dad, Bonnie. So good that he's hanging in there and still enjoying life even though some things aren't working as well for him as they once did. That's fun that your parents got such a big spread in the paper. I'm sure many enjoyed reading about their lives and the property. You can give me a history lesson any time.

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  7. My father loved fishing and reading. Often at the same time.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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    1. That's interesting, Mary. I guess the reading was for in between nibbles on his line. He might have loved audio books and ear phones.

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  8. My dad loved peanuts, baseball, woodworking, and gardening. He grew the best tomatoes! Sure do miss him.

    sweetrunfarm@yahoo.com

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    1. I like the way you list what your dad liked, Nancy. And those tomatoes. Yum! I miss my dad too.

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  9. My daddy has always been a hard worker and good provider for my mother and me. He has always put a God first in his life and led his family with that knowledge as well. To this day, I always fell such pride and thankfulness when I see him walk down the isle at church to lead the congregation in prayer. He will celebrate his 87th birthday in a few months and he still golfs every day of the week. He taught me well, he always set a good example, and he loves mightily. I am very blessed!

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    1. You are blessed, Melanie, to have such a good dad to love you and set that great example. Those prayers and that golf may be what's keeping him going strong at his age.

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  10. My daddy liked traveling and woodworking, but one of his favorite things was making homemade ice cream. Every summer he always had the freezer out and made ice cream once or twice a week.

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    1. My dad loved homemade ice cream too, Susan. But we rarely were able to make anything but banana. That was what he liked best and it was hard to argue with the result. That's one of the things all the grandkids remember - cranking the ice cream freezer and pouring in ice and salt to help freeze it.

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  11. My dad was in the Navy for 25 years. After working the rest of his life so he and mom could retire good, he fished or read every available moment. He was such a wonderful man that pushed reading because " reading will take you places you may never other wise get to go .. " He passed when he fell while fishing, doing what he loved most .. thank you for the chance to win a great prize !!

    Rosemary rfoley@salemstate.edu

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Thanks for joining the conversation. I like hearing what you have to say. Thanks for dropping by.