Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Grandmothers Say the Funniest Things

All right, what funny things did your grandmother say? I know there's probably something. Some odd turn of phrase or perhaps mispronunciation, something that still makes you smile when you remember. Jackie called her grandmother's wise little saying "grandma-isms." So here are a few of those grandma-isms I gleaned out of your e-mails and comments.
Susan said her grandmother would load down the table with food and then say, "If there's something you want that's not here, just tell me and we'll hunt it up!"


LuAnn's grandmother-in-law said this to LuAnn's husband because he had waited so long to bring his family to visit her. "I oughtta throw you across the yard." 

Sandi says her grandmother was ready with "that'll do" whenever they were "acting up." I heard that one some when I was a kid and know I said it a few times myself. My mom was also fond of "cut the comedy." Her father told her the same thing and she said she got in a lot of trouble once when she told him she would if he'd let her have the scissors. I knew better than to ask for the scissors.

Teresa says her grandmother's favorite saying was that she "loved us all the same." And that she meant it even if she did have 50 grandchildren to love the same. She'd stand at the door and kiss every child who came through the door. 

 Patty used to spend the night with her grandma and no matter the temp outside she would load the bed with quilts. Patty says, "She would have so many of those heavy quilts on the bed I couldn't move! When I thought she was asleep I would wiggle out from under those quilts (not only were they heavy, I was burning up. Summer is way to hot for quilts!) get cooled off and comfortable and then I would hear grandma say "poor little thing is going to get cold" and all those quilts would cover me up! 


It's a fact that grandparents are determined to not let their grandkids catch a chill. My father-in-law used to build up the fire until we'd be roasting and thinking it might be good to go sit on the front porch in the middle of January. But he made sure the "babies" didn't get cold.

My aunt who was like a grandmother to me said "bum" for bomb. Every time I heard her I had to think twice about what she meant. She also liked to say "You'll never notice it on a galloping horse" whenever a seam in something I was sewing wasn't perfect. And when we took sponge baths at her house, she'd tell us to wash as far down as possible and then as far up as possible and then wash possible. 

My other grandmother was famous for saying "Go to sleep. You'll feel better in the morning" whenever any of her children complained with any kind of ache or pain. I've been known to say the same and more often than not, it turned out to be true. One of my other favorite sayings for my kids was "If you don't like, don't eat it." I don't say that to the grandkids as much. I just ask if they'd like a little candy instead. :) My kids have plenty of my oddities to grin about, but if they get to grinning too much, I'll just tell them to cut the comedy and dare them to ask for the scissors.
  
I want to thank all of you for sharing your grandmothers with me. Some shared about loved ones who acted the grandmother role for them. Others of you shared how you never knew your grandparents but that you were making the most of being grandmothers yourself. I always enjoy my giveaways more when the stories come in with the entries. You didn't have to share a grandmother story to enter, but I'm glad a lot of you wanted to walk down memory lane and remember your grandmothers. I also hope you've enjoyed the stories I was able to share forward.

Monday I'll be drawing for the winner of the lilac Grandmother's Bible, so there are still a few days to throw your name in my hat if you haven't already entered. The picture up top is the Bible open to one of the devotionals "The Art of Grandparenting." I'm quite confident that many of you have that art figured out.

Thanks for reading and I'd love to hear something your grandmother said that maybe made you smile.


15 comments:

  1. As I read your post Ann it occured to me it was not what Granny said but how she said it that had us often laughing! To hear her tell tales of when she grew up (prior and during WW1) she must have been a real firecracker! Can you tell I miss her?!
    Blessings to you and yours this Easter and always,

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    1. It's great to know you came from "firecracker" stock, Noelle. And good that you were so ready to listen to and enjoy your granny's stories. A double blessing to you and also to her.

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  2. Whenever one of us kids were coughing she'd look at us and say "Quit yer barking." Then she'd chuckle to herself and we'd all laugh. When I was little, she lived with us for a time and when I'd wake up at night after a bad dream I would go and climb in bed with her. She'd calm my fears by engaging me in a snoring contest. The one who could "snore" the loudest won! Ah, I miss her!

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    1. I've heard people say that about the coughing too, Marcy. The snoring contest sounds like it did the trick for those bad dreams. A good grandmother is a blessing.

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  3. Oh my... I was very very lucky to live practically next door to my granparents and literally next door to the other set. my maternal grandmothers house was the gathering place for all the cousins when they came to visit, the 4 oldest were all within a few years of each other and were constantly up to some mischief. I specifically remember being threatened with 'I will put you over my checkered apron' which was a completely empty threat and we knew it, worry only came when she mentioned that she was going to inform our grandfather of our behavior, that got us all sitting quietly in front of the radio (they had no TV) or on the hammocks outside with a book depending on the weather.

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    1. That checkered apron saying has been around. I've heard it from other older people, Tara. But sounds as if she knew the real way to get all of you to calm down. A hammock with a book sounds like a fine "punishment."

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  4. My grandmother used to say "Charity starts at home "

    Lisa

    Korell62@aol.com

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    1. I've heard that plenty too and you know what, I've probably said it a few times. For sure, learning to be charitable begins at home.

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  5. My grandmother use to say to me, that now your done with lunch, you can go pick some grapes off the vines..:D...when I would be staying there with her over the summer..

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    1. Did you go pick those grapes and eat some for your dessert, Kathy? Was she really meaning for you to go pick grapes or did that mean something else?

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  6. My grandmother would always tell me to put a headscarf on ,or I was going to catch a cold.She would never let any of us and most of her grandchildren lived either with her or close to her,and she always made us wait until the 1st. day of May to start going barefooted because she thought we would catch a cold.When I was about 6 and caught one of the childhood diaseses,she would make me stay in a dark room with a quilt around me in the summer time because she would say ,i'd get chilled and I couldn't come outside because the sun would make me go blind,now wheather any of these facts were true or not,I don't know but she sure did.I didn't like it when she made me do it and I begged her to let me come outside where they all were sitting under the shade tree and she finally gave in and let me come outside but I had to keep the quilt around me and put on sun glasses.I can just about think what I looked like in 90 degree weather if anyone besides family saw me.I loved her no matter what she made me do'She was a sweetheart.

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    1. A grandmother who loves you doesn't want you to "catch your death of cold." We smile about that now, but when some of them were growing up or at least when their parents were, medicine wasn't as good and children did catch things they didn't survive. Childhood diseases were once deadly, so your grandmother aimed to protect you and another plus - she figured out a way for you to have a portable sauna with that quilt. :) Now my grandkids won't even wear coats to school when the winter winds are blowing. They need your grandmother around!!

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    2. P.S. That first day of May to go barefoot was a pretty hard and fast rule when I was a kid too.

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  7. Sadly, I never knew either of my grand-mothers. My paternal grand-mother passed before I was born and my maternal grand-mother passed when I was 2 years old. I guess that is why I always appreciated having the opportunity to be a grandma to my four grand-children. I am very close to all four of them and we share a lot of memories together. Not sure what they would share about what I say that makes them smile :).
    And...thanks for connecting with me on Twitter Ann,and sharing your blog with me, really enjoyed visiting. (Leona with the "smiley sunglasses")

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    1. Thanks for coming over, Leona. I'll throw your name in my hat for the chance to win the Grandmother's Bible or one of the other prizes. I'm trying to connect with more people on Twitter, but I have a hard time being brief so sometimes my Facebook page works better or at least easier for me. Keep smiling and enjoying those grandkids.

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Thanks for joining the conversation. I like hearing what you have to say. Thanks for dropping by.